playstatixn:
 131
30 Jun 14 at 10 am

(Source: imnotwordy, via babyyyyfat)

 104
21 Jun 14 at 11 pm

throwherinthewater:

Les amours jaunes, directed by Jean Rollin, 1958

Watch in full here.

(via 13monden)

throwherinthewater:

Les amours jaunes, directed by Jean Rollin, 1958
Watch in full here.
 1217
21 Jun 14 at 8 pm

mehreenkasana:

Asian Suffragettes – Women Who Made a Difference

By the 1900s, women had been campaigning for the right to vote for nearly half a century. In 1903, the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) was founded in Manchester, breathing new life into the suffragette movement and fighting for the rights of all women, regardless of their nationality.

Although British women were perceived as the weaker sex, they were also labelled as morally superior to men, making them the logical choice to raise children and care for the home. Inevitably, feminists were accused of neglecting their nurturing duties during their public struggle for equality. Their response to this was to find a cause that would emphasise their moral high ground, giving them a plausible reason to fight for their rights.

Asian women filled this niche.

During this tumultuous time and at the height of British colonisation, many Asian women found themselves adrift within British society. Most had entered the country on ships employed by English families as ayahs (nannies) and, once they’d served their few weeks at sea, were dismissed, expected to survive on their own. Securing passage back to India was seasonal and often difficult especially during wartime, leaving hundreds of young women stranded far from home.

Many British high society feminists voiced concerns for their Indian sisters, regarding them as passive victims. Their mission was to rescue these perceived objects of pity and misfortune. This concept was not limited to the stranded ayahs in Britain but was generalised to include the oppressed women still in Asia.

A gradual change in this compassionate but superior attitude came about as Asian women grew stronger and more outspoken, not only in Britain but also in India. By 1905, Asian women were emerging to show public support of various political activities and the exploitation of women and their traditional roles were challenged.

(via fuckyeahsouthasia)

mehreenkasana:

Asian Suffragettes – Women Who Made a Difference
By the 1900s, women had been campaigning for the right to vote for nearly half a century. In 1903, the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) was founded in Manchester, breathing new life into the suffragette movement and fighting for the rights of all women, regardless of their nationality.
Although British women were perceived as the weaker sex, they were also labelled as morally superior to men, making them the logical choice to raise children and care for the home. Inevitably, feminists were accused of neglecting their nurturing duties during their public struggle for equality. Their response to this was to find a cause that would emphasise their moral high ground, giving them a plausible reason to fight for their rights.
Asian women filled this niche.
During this tumultuous time and at the height of British colonisation, many Asian women found themselves adrift within British society. Most had entered the country on ships employed by English families as ayahs (nannies) and, once they’d served their few weeks at sea, were dismissed, expected to survive on their own. Securing passage back to India was seasonal and often difficult especially during wartime, leaving hundreds of young women stranded far from home.
Many British high society feminists voiced concerns for their Indian sisters, regarding them as passive victims. Their mission was to rescue these perceived objects of pity and misfortune. This concept was not limited to the stranded ayahs in Britain but was generalised to include the oppressed women still in Asia.
A gradual change in this compassionate but superior attitude came about as Asian women grew stronger and more outspoken, not only in Britain but also in India. By 1905, Asian women were emerging to show public support of various political activities and the exploitation of women and their traditional roles were challenged.
 1843
21 Jun 14 at 2 pm

mossycoat:

i LIVE for completely unrelated pieces of art that have near identical colour schemes

(Femme assise dans un fauteuil (1953) - Pablo Picasso)
(Rose McGowan for Interview magazine, October 1995)

(via crunchwrapmistress)

 3537
21 Jun 14 at 2 pm

unsophisticatedheart1980:

David Foster Wallace / The Pale King

(Source: aseaofquotes, via nolanna)

tags: etc 
unsophisticatedheart1980:

David Foster Wallace / The Pale King
 180
21 Jun 14 at 12 am

mughalshit:

Women Looking at the Moon

India, Mughal, c. 1760

Opaque watercolors and gold on paper

(Source: mfa.org, via solipsistictendencies)

mughalshit:

Women Looking at the Moon
India, Mughal, c. 1760
Opaque watercolors and gold on paper
 14740
20 Jun 14 at 11 pm

Mano del Desierto, Atacama Desert, Chile

(via g-ems)


Mano del Desierto, Atacama Desert, Chile
 2304
20 Jun 14 at 11 pm

(Source: glust, via productofsweden)

 614
20 Jun 14 at 11 pm

little-miss-melancholy:

Athenais, 1908 (detail) by John William Godward (1861–1922)

(via yayamaura)

little-miss-melancholy:

Athenais, 1908 (detail) by John William Godward (1861–1922)
 257
20 Jun 14 at 11 pm

joelwh:

John Divola

(via mehreenqudosi)

joelwh:

John Divola
nevver:

Athena
 174420
19 Jun 14 at 8 pm

 Hillary Clinton speaking at Simmons Leadership Conference (via femininefreak)

SHOTS FIRED.

(via unforgettabledetritus)

(via dynastylnoire)

"It’s always surprising to me how many young women think they have to be perfect. I rarely meet a young man who doesn’t think he already is."

 14627
14 Jun 14 at 1 pm

خليل جبران Khalil Gibran  (via arabarabarab)

(Source: antieverythingism, via arabarabarab)

tags: etc 

"Much of your pain is self-chosen."

 1389
10 Jun 14 at 11 pm

stvdy:

Iceland (Andre Ermolaev)

(Source: umq, via kushandjcrew)

stvdy:

Iceland (Andre Ermolaev)